How to Find, Use, and Cite Images Online

Even when you have permission to use an image, you should cite the original source, creator and/or copyright owner. Many websites will have a statement of usage or terms of use listed for their images – this is their guidelines for permission they give you to use their photos and they rules they want you to follow.

It is best practice to find credible images in collections that allow you to use their images; this means they have licenses that allow their use.

The library does have some image resources listed under Multimedia on the library homepage. Keep in mind, that even with library image resources, you need to make sure you have permission to use the images and you always need to cite when you use anything from in the online library.

There are many Creative Commons cites that allow you to do this. Some examples of sites like this:

Many of you are probably used to using Google to search for images. One very important thing that you want to keep in mind when doing this is that Google Image Search is just a search, it is not the website that the image is on and it is not the original home of that image. To find the actual source of that image, which is what you need to cite if you use it, you need to click on the image in Google Image Search and then click the “Visit Page” button on the right side of the image.

An example of a Google Image Search for panda bear images

citegoogleimagefindoriginal

Click the “Visit Page” button to see the original source of this image to find info you need to cite the image. (“National Geographic Kids Giant Panda Facts and Pictures”, 2015)

This is the original source for this image. I need to use this URL address as my retrieved from link in my citation. I also need to make sure this site gives permission to use this image.

(“National Geographic Kids Giant Panda Facts and Pictures”, 2015)

Once you get to the original website the image was found on, you want to look for source information for the image. See if you can spot the information on the copyright owner or photographer (author), the date, the name of the website, the title for the image. This is all information you need to cite the image. You also want to make sure this site allows you to use this image. Look for some mention of terms of use on the webpage.

The example website I used, National Geographic Kids, calls this “terms of service.” Click on this to see their permission information if it is not listed with the actual image on the page. When I get to their Terms of Use page, there is a lot of information but eventually there is a section called “Limited Content License” that talks about using information, images, text, etc. from their website.

(“National Geographic Kids Terms of Use”, 2017)

(“National Geographic Kids Terms of Use”, 2017)

This can get a bit complicated, so you can see why it is often much easier to use one of the creative commons image sites that already gives you permission and information to cite is fairly easy to locate. Either way, always cite the original source, if you are able to find it.

How to cite images in your assignment and resources list:

On the library website, we link to citation style guides that will give you all of the information on how to cite many types of resources. Direct links are below.

APA:

MLA:

 

Reference List:

National Geographic Kids Giant Panda Facts and Pictures. (2015, February 17). Retrieved July 20, 2017, from http://kids.nationalgeographic.com/animals/giant-panda/#giant-panda-eating.jpg
National Geographic Kids Terms of Use. (2017, July 11). Retrieved July 20, 2017, from http://www.nationalgeographic.com/community/terms/
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Popular Assignment Topics: Antibullying Programs in Schools

Here at the library, we take notice when we get asked about the same assignment topic multiple times. One of those topics is antibullying programs in schools. Here are some tips on how to do research on these programs.

On the library homepage www.esc.edu/library select Subject Guides.

Select the Education Subject guide. Here, you can learn more about Scholarly or Peer Reviewed articles in the center column.

Look at the left hand column under the heading “Searching for a topic? Use databases.”

You want to select databases here to search for your topic. I suggest starting with Education Source and ERIC.

image of education subject guide showing where the links to Education Source and ERIC databases are located

In the database, select Advanced Search. Here you can break down your search topic into multiple keywords like antibullying AND programs. Down below where it lets you limit your search, you can check the box to limit results to Scholarly/Peer Reviewed and then you can hit search. You can then go through the search results to see which articles are available in our library and fit your assignment needs.

image of advanced search in Education Source

Where is the full-text article? Is the date for the article fairly recent and you don’t see a link to view the full-text? The article may be too new to be available online yet. Instead, do you see a link to Full-text Finder? Click Full Text Finder to search the rest of the library to see if we have the article elsewhere in our collections.

image of search results in Education Source

How do I find articles in the online library?

When you are looking for an article in the online library, there are a few ways to go about searching based on what you are looking for.


Are you looking for an article but you only have the title or title and author?

Image of OneSearch on library homepage

If you just have the title of the article and not the full citation information, you want to start your search on the library homepage with OneSearch. Type the title of the article in quotes and search to see if it locates it in our collection. If it does not locate it, check with your instructor about where to access this reading.


Do you have the title of the article, the name of the journal it was published in, the date, the author, volume and issue number, etc? This is the full citation information.

image of journal finder link on library homepage

If you have the full citation information for an article, you can search for the article via the journal it was published in. You can search for this in Journal Finder which you can find on the library homepage.

image of search in journal finder

Type the title of the journal (not the article) and search for it. When it is located in our collection, you will see the name(s) of the databases in our library that have that journal. Look at the date range to see if your article fits and then select the database title that has the date you need. You can then browse in the database for the date, volume and issue you need for your article.

image of search results in journal finder


Were you asked to look for articles in a certain journal or in a list of journals recommended for an assignment?

To search in a specific journal that your instructor listed, you will find it similarly to the steps above. You can search for this in Journal Finder which you can find on the library homepage.

Type the title of the journal (not the topic) and search for it. When it is located in our collection, you will see the name(s) of the databases in our library that have that journal. Look at the date range to see if your article fits and then select the database title that has the date you need. Once you select the database, you should see the option to search within this publication and this is where you can search for your topic in this journal.

If the journal you are looking for is Harvard Business Review, you need to access this differently. Please see our subject guide section with directions on how to find HBR.


Were you asked to do research and find articles on a topic for your assignment?

When your instructor asks you to find articles on a topic for your assignment, you want to search for them in the subject guides on the library homepage. You will see the option to select a subject from the list. Try to select a subject that your topic fits into, for example if you are researching marketing, you will select Business, Management & Economics. If you aren’t sure which one to choose, start with Get Started/Multidisciplinary which is a subject guide that covers all topics generally.

image of subject guides link on library homepage subguides2

When you get to the subject guide, you should see a list of databases selected by the librarians to fit your subject area well. You can go into those databases and search for your topic there.

image of subject guide list of databases


If you try these steps and still cannot find articles on your topic, the librarians are here to help! Feel free to contact us with any questions about searching for your topic, for specific articles or e-books.

askalibrarian.esc.edu
800-847-3000, ext. 2222

How to find movie or book reviews in the online library

I was helping a student today in chat and unfortunately, the student left chat before I could give them more help on how to find the reviews that they needed for an assignment.  Hopefully that student will see this post and since it is something we often get asked about, I thought it could be helpful for other students to learn about this too. If you need any help with this, please contact us at Ask a Librarian or Ask Us 24/7 chat and a librarian is happy to help.

To find movie or film reviews/criticism:

  • On the library homepage http://www.esc.edu/library  go to the OneSearch box Image of OneSearch search box on the library homepage
  • Type the name of the film you are researching in quotes.
  • If your movie title can also describe something else, you may want to add more information. For example, “The Gold Rush” could also be about the historic Gold Rush so you might have better luck searching for “The Gold Rush” AND Charlie Chaplin or you can search for “The Gold Rush” AND movie Image of search box containing the words "The Gold Rush" in quotes AND in all caps and Charlie Chaplin
  • You can limit your search results in the left column.  Under the heading “Limit To” you may want to check the box for Scholarly/Peer Reviewed Journals if your instructor asked for that.
  • You can also limit your search results by selecting Reviews under the heading “Source Types”

 

To find book or literature reviews/criticism:

  • To find book reviews or literary criticism, you can try the steps above but there is a library database that is particularly good for this topic.
  • On the library homepage http://www.esc.edu/library select the option for Subject Guides.
  • This expands a list where you can select “Language and Literature”
  • When you get to he guide for Language and Literature, you will see a list of Journal Article Databases.
  • In that list, select “Literature Resources”Image of the Literature Resources database link listed on the Language and Literature Subject Guide
  • You can search for the title in quotes here or you can also search for a particular author.
  • Search results will be broken down into Literature Criticism, Biographies, Topic & Work Overviews, Reviews & News, Primary Sources & Literary Works, and Multimedia. ethanfrome1 Image of search results for a search of Ethan Frome in literature resources database

Popular Assignment Topics: Antibullying Programs in Schools

Here at the library, we take notice when we get asked about the same assignment topic multiple times.  One of those topics is antibullying programs in schools.  Here are some tips on how to do research on these programs.

On the library homepage www.esc.edu/library select Subject Guides.

Select the Education Subject guide. Here, you can learn more about Scholarly or Peer Reviewed articles in the center column.

Look at the left hand column under the heading “Searching for a topic? Use databases.”

You want to select databases here to search for your topic.  I suggest starting with Education Source and ERIC.

image of education subject guide showing where the links to Education Source and ERIC databases are located

In the database, select Advanced Search.  Here you can break down your search topic into multiple keywords like antibullying AND programs. Down below where it lets you limit your search, you can check the box to limit results to Scholarly/Peer Reviewed and then you can hit search.  You can then go through the search results to see which articles are available in our library and fit your assignment needs.

image of advanced search in Education Source

Where is the full-text article?  Is the date for the article fairly recent and you don’t see a link to view the full-text? The article may be too new to be available online yet.  Instead, do you see a link to Full-text Finder?  Click Full Text Finder to search the rest of the library to see if we have the article elsewhere in our collections.

image of search results in Education Source

How do I find articles in the online library?

When you are looking for an article in the online library, there are a few ways to go about searching based on what you are looking for.


Are you looking for an article but you only have the title or title and author?

Image of OneSearch on library homepage

If you just have the title of the article and not the full citation information, you want to start your search on the library homepage with OneSearch. Type the title of the article in quotes and search to see if it locates it in our collection. If it does not locate it, check with your instructor about where to access this reading.


Do you have the title of the article, the name of the journal it was published in, the date, the author, volume and issue number, etc? This is the full citation information.

image of journal finder link on library homepage

If you have the full citation information for an article, you can search for the article via the journal it was published in. You can search for this in Journal Finder which you can find on the library homepage.

image of search in journal finder

Type the title of the journal (not the article) and search for it. When it is located in our collection, you will see the name(s) of the databases in our library that have that journal. Look at the date range to see if your article fits and then select the database title that has the date you need. You can then browse in the database for the date, volume and issue you need for your article.

image of search results in journal finder


Were you asked to look for articles in a certain journal or in a list of journals recommended for an assignment?

To search in a specific journal that your instructor listed, you will find it similarly to the steps above. You can search for this in Journal Finder which you can find on the library homepage.

Type the title of the journal (not the topic) and search for it. When it is located in our collection, you will see the name(s) of the databases in our library that have that journal. Look at the date range to see if your article fits and then select the database title that has the date you need. Once you select the database, you should see the option to search within this publication and this is where you can search for your topic in this journal.


Were you asked to do research and find articles on a topic for your assignment?

When your instructor asks you to find articles on a topic for your assignment, you want to search for them in the subject guides on the library homepage. You will see the option to select a subject from the list. Try to select a subject that your topic fits into, for example if you are researching marketing, you will select Business, Management & Economics. If you aren’t sure which one to choose, start with Get Started/Multidisciplinary which is a subject guide that covers all topics generally.

image of subject guides link on library homepage subguides2

When you get to the subject guide, you should see a list of databases selected by the librarians to fit your subject area well. You can go into those databases and search for your topic there.

image of subject guide list of databases


If you try these steps and still cannot find articles on your topic, the librarians are here to help! Feel free to contact us with any questions about searching for your topic, for specific articles or e-books.

askalibrarian.esc.edu
800-847-3000, ext. 2222

Introducing the Research Skills Tutorial

You may have noticed something new on the library’s homepage.  Just in case you didn’t, we wanted to introduce you to our brand new Research Skills Tutorial.  This is intended to replace our Information Skills Tutorial that has been up since 2010 but don’t worry, you won’t lose anything when the Information Skills Tutorial goes away.

Link to the Research Skills Tutorial on the library homepageYou can find the link on the library homepage under the heading of Learn.  You can also find it directly at http://subjectguides.esc.edu/researchskillstutorial

The Research Skills Tutorial is like the Information Skills Tutorial but better.  The content has been updated to make sure it is current and appropriate for the needs of our students and faculty in 2015.  It looks much nicer and it is easier to navigate. It is also more focused and interactive.

Image of the screen when viewing the Information Skills TutorialWhen you are in the Research Skills Tutorial, you can use the menu on the left side of the screen to find what  you need.  You can choose one section to view information as needed or go through the entire tutorial to sharpen your research skills.  The best part is that you can come back to the tutorial at any time to freshen up on certain things.  Image of the menu for the Research Skills TutorialSections include the following:

  1. Developing Research Questions – This includes information on how to turn your topic into a research question and information on how to get background information on your topic.
  2. Understanding Information Sources – This will take you through the types of information sources, how to tell the difference between scholarly, popular and trade publications, as well as the difference between primary, secondary, and tertiary sources, in addition to other types of sources.
  3. Searching for Information Sources – This reviews the difference between using library resources and web resources, how to put your search terms together and combine your terms to get the best results possible, and gives you help with searching online in search engines like Google.
  4. Managing Search Results – This goes over how to understand your search results and how to save them for later on in your research.
  5. Evaluating Information Sources – This section talks about how to tell if a source is reliable and credible.  Does this source have accuracy, validity, authority?  How do I know these things from looking at a source?  This section will walk you through it.
  6. Citing Information Sources – This explains why we need to cite and what a citation is.  You will get a review of the different citation styles and links to citation style guides and tips for doing your citations.